Oct 29
Rider Perception
icon1 Guy | icon2 Small Talk | icon4 10 29th, 2009| icon3No Comments »

Somebody posted this link on one of the forums I belong to.
Click here to take test.
It’s from the Motorcycle Safety Foundation and is about rider perception. It’s a test to see how well you, as a rider, perceive the conditions shown to you in a scene. It was educational for me. I thought I’d do better. I took the test on slow and scored 17 of 20 on the signs, and 14 of 20 on the collision traps.
The site gives you the reasoning behind the acceptable answer once you finish with each question. It made several good points I hadn ‘t thought of. While this isn’t riding, it’s probably still a good exercise. I’d rather make mistakes on a computer than on a bike.

Oct 22

I’m back from vacation finally. Back in January, when my wife locked in her vacation schedule for the year, we’d planned the great American motorcycle vacation. We took two weeks in a row and planned a long ride to the West Coast, or East. Maybe we’d just head south, or north. We were less concerned about where we were going than about the idea of getting there on the bike.
As the months rolled by, it became apparent that we weren’t going to be able to take a long trip. We came up with a Plan B. We’d stay based at our house for the first week and take some of the 400- to 600-mile runs we’d been wanting to make that are so hard over just a weekend. We could spend a night on the road for the longer rides. Week 2 would see us spoiling the grandkids, but we’d also load Maggie up in the truck and hit some of the Hill County rides, west of Fort Worth.
It rained all but one day the entire two weeks we were off.
So the “Great Motorcycle” vacation of 2009 turned into the “Great Work on the House” vacation. I keep telling myself that in a few years, walking on the new kitchen floor will be more pleasant than fond memories of a great ride.
I almost believe it.
Guy Wheatley
Ripping up the kitchen floor was a good outlet for the frustration of not being able to ride. I had to tear it out down to the joists. Those are 4 x 8 cedar timbers. I think the guy who put the last floor in got paid by the nail. I had the chance to work out a LOT of frustration about riding. Of course I just replaced it with frustration about the floor!


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— Guy Wheatley

Oct 1
Almost twice as many military personnel died in motorcycle wrecks in the fiscal year ending Sept. 1, 2008, as in the previous year. The number was 124, up from 72. The sad story of a brave soldier surviving a tour in Iraq or Afghanistan, only to die in a motorcycle wreck a few weeks or days after coming back to the United States, has been repeated too many times. These are not ordinary citizens. In many cases they are young. They are America’s best legacy for the future. Their recent duties have desensitized many of them to the natural warnings that normally inhibit dangerous behavior.
“We don’t have the luxury of losing people to preventable mishaps, that’s why there’s an urgent need to do something,” said April K. Phillips, a Navy spokesman.
The military is now requiring riding classes, screening riders for risky behavior, and organizing racing events where military riders can more safely relieve the need for an adrenaline rush. They also require them to wear safety equipment such as helmets.
The armed services are acting responsibility by implementing these procedures to protect soldiers, sailors and marines. The benefits will also extend to the civilian population. Not only will they be less likely to cause injury or death to civilians on the highway, but they are setting an example. There are at least a few riders out there who think that taking a safety course, or wearing a helmet is a little sissy. These are the bravest people in the world. Many of them have faced death several times, and continued to do their job. If they can wear helmets and take safety classes, so can the rest of us. The military leaders know it’s not sissy. It’s smart.
Military Motorcycle Deaths.
The Associated Press
In this Sept. 10, 2009 photo, Marine Corps Sgt. Doranda Rodela, left, talks with safety instructor Richard Stampp, during a motorcycle safety class held at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in northern San Diego County. Alarmed by hundreds of motorcycle deaths by off-duty marines, soldiers and sailors over the last several years, the military is requiring riding classes, screening riders for risky behavior and organizing racing events for a safe adrenaline rush.


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— Guy Wheatley