Military Motorcycle Deaths

Almost twice as many military personnel died in motorcycle wrecks in the fiscal year ending Sept. 1, 2008, as in the previous year. The number was 124, up from 72. The sad story of a brave soldier surviving a tour in Iraq or Afghanistan, only to die in a motorcycle wreck a few weeks or days after coming back to the United States, has been repeated too many times. These are not ordinary citizens. In many cases they are young. They are America’s best legacy for the future. Their recent duties have desensitized many of them to the natural warnings that normally inhibit dangerous behavior.
“We don’t have the luxury of losing people to preventable mishaps, that’s why there’s an urgent need to do something,” said April K. Phillips, a Navy spokesman.
The military is now requiring riding classes, screening riders for risky behavior, and organizing racing events where military riders can more safely relieve the need for an adrenaline rush. They also require them to wear safety equipment such as helmets.
The armed services are acting responsibility by implementing these procedures to protect soldiers, sailors and marines. The benefits will also extend to the civilian population. Not only will they be less likely to cause injury or death to civilians on the highway, but they are setting an example. There are at least a few riders out there who think that taking a safety course, or wearing a helmet is a little sissy. These are the bravest people in the world. Many of them have faced death several times, and continued to do their job. If they can wear helmets and take safety classes, so can the rest of us. The military leaders know it’s not sissy. It’s smart.
Military Motorcycle Deaths.
The Associated Press
In this Sept. 10, 2009 photo, Marine Corps Sgt. Doranda Rodela, left, talks with safety instructor Richard Stampp, during a motorcycle safety class held at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in northern San Diego County. Alarmed by hundreds of motorcycle deaths by off-duty marines, soldiers and sailors over the last several years, the military is requiring riding classes, screening riders for risky behavior and organizing racing events for a safe adrenaline rush.


.
.
.
.
.
.
.

— Guy Wheatley

One Response

  1. oldman Says:

    The catch phrase to me was, off duty,nothing about ex military.Protecting our young heros? Or their present investment? They are given a weapon and ask to serve and protect our freedom, which they do,and when they get home they are told it’s too dangerous to ride a motorcycle? When these young men and women are off duty they should have every freedom anyone else has! Yes offer them the best motorcycle traing money can buy and encourage them to take advantage of it, but do not take away their freedom to choose. As long as it’s an offer, great, I’m all for it. Remember old enough to fight but not old enough to vote! Or old enough to fight but not old enough to drink.Anyone that can pass the Motorcycle drivers test can ride whatever they choose,it’s still our right, it should be their right too. Every life is precious, but living on the edge is a freedom, skydiving, mountain climbing, every form of racing imaginable are all inherently dangerous.I just think it’s a little hypocritical to send these young people to fight for freedom and then restrict theirs.

Leave a Comment

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.