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LONDON — The British prime minister who called the 2016 Brexit referendum and then saw the public vote to leave the European Union, creating the nation's prolonged political crisis, says he is sorry for the divisions it has caused.

David Cameron said in an interview published Saturday that he thinks about the consequences of the Brexit referendum "every single day" and worries "desperately" about what will happen next.

"I deeply regret the outcome and accept that my approach failed," he said. "The decisions I took contributed to that failure. I failed."

It is the closest the 52-year-old Cameron has come to a public apology for setting in motion events that led to the abrupt end of his premiership the next month and brought Britain into an unending political crisis. He admitted that many people blame him for the Brexit divisions that have deepened since the referendum and will never forgive him, but he defended his decision to call the vote.

Cameron, who served as prime minister from 2010 to 2016, spoke to The Times newspaper to promote his soon-to-be-published memoir.

He had supported remaining in the EU and resigned the morning after the 2016 referendum, staying out of electoral politics and largely out of the public eye since then.

His successor — Theresa May — wrestled with all the issues that leaving the EU entails and was not able to win parliamentary backing for a divorce plan that she agreed upon with EU leaders. She resigned, bringing fellow Conservative Boris Johnson to power
in July.

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