Today's Paper Weather Latest Obits Jobs Classifieds Newsletters
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

KANSAS CITY, Mo.—Gunther Cunningham's life would have been vastly different had his family not emigrated from postwar Germany, settling in California when he was a young boy.

For one thing, he almost certainly never would have dedicated his life to football.

Yet Cunningham would go on to spend more than five decades in the game, including coaching stints in college and the CFL before making a name for himself in the NFL. He worked for six different franchises over 34 years in the league, including a two-year stint as head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs.

Cunningham died on Saturday after a brief illness. He was 72.

His wife, Rene, said in a statement Monday that Cunningham died in Detroit, where he had served as defensive coordinator and a senior coaching assistant for the Lions before retiring in 2016.

"My family and I are deeply saddened to hear the news of Gunther's passing," Chiefs owner Clark Hunt said in a statement. "He led some of the most feared defenses in our franchise's history with his energetic and motivating coaching style. Gunther made a tremendous impact on so many lives on and off the playing field in nearly five decades of coaching."

The Lions said in a statement that Cunningham will "forever be remembered as one of the great men in our game. He left a lasting impact on every person who was fortunate enough to work with him."

Cunningham's father, Garner, was an American serving in the Air Force in Germany when he met his German wife, Katherina. Their precocious boy was born in Munich in 1946, and the family soon moved to the U.S. and settled in California, where Cunningham—who spoke no English—was ridiculed like many post-World War II immigrants for both his accent and ancestry.

It was on the football field where he found his voice.

Cunningham became a star linebacker for his high school team in Lompoc, and earned a scholarship to play at Oregon. His aptitude for the game made him a natural coach, and Cunningham got his start as the Ducks' defensive line coach from 1969-71.

He later coached at Arkansas, Stanford and California before a stint with Hamilton in the CFL. He then followed Frank Kush to the Baltimore Colts, where he got his first NFL coaching job.

Colts owner Jim Irsay tweeted that Cunningham was "one of the finest men in our business."

Cunningham eventually became one of the most aggressive and successful defensive coaches in the league, burnishing his reputation with the Chargers and Raiders before landing in Kansas City. He was an integral part of Marty Schottenheimer's best teams as the Chiefs' defensive coordinator, and was promoted to head coach when Schottenheimer resigned after the 1998 season.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT