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Jordan aims to disappoint his father's fans

Jordan aims to disappoint his father's fans

January 12th, 2018 by Associated Press in Sports Pro

In this Jan. 7, 2018, file photo, New Orleans Saints defensive end Cameron Jordan (94) celebrates a defensive stop in the second half of an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers, in New Orleans. Newly named All-Pro for the first time, Saints defensive Cam Jordan takes his playful yet menacing presence this weekend to the city where his father became a Pro Bowl tight end.

Photo by Associated Press

METAIRIE, La.—As much as Saints All-Pro Cam Jordon admires his father, Steve, and effusively praises the former Minnesota Vikings tight end, he hasn't been able to resist the urge to be his own man.

Postseason Schedule

Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 13
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 3:35 p.m. (NBC)
Tennessee at New England, 7:15 p.m. (CBS)

Sunday, Jan. 14
Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. (CBS)
New Orleans at Minnesota, 3:40 p.m. (FOX)

Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 4
At Minneapolis 6:30 p.m. (NBC)

Cam Jordan never wanted to play tight end, and acknowledged on Thursday that he doesn't always follow his father's advice, either, particularly when it comes to his playful antics and comments when engaging the media.

When Jordan consistently gets the better of an offensive lineman, he'll refer to him as "Speed Bump Magee." After last Sunday's playoff victory over Carolina, Jordan conspicuously positioned a bottle of Jordan cabernet (not a family business) on the top shelf of his locker and pledged to send his namesake wine to his namesake star quarterback, Cam Newton.

Jordan said his father, "always tries to tone me back. He's always like, 'Hey dude, have you thought about the ramifications?'"

"No, I haven't. I shot my shot and said what I said and had to back it up," the younger Jordan continued. "At 28, I'm in my physical prime so at this point I feel like I can back it up."

Indeed, Jordan was named first-team Associated Press All-Pro for the first time in his career this season—his seventh since being New Orleans' first of two first-round draft choices in 2011 out of California. The 6-foot-4, 287-pound edge rusher had 13 sacks, 17 tackles for losses, 28 QB hits, 11 passes defended (mostly batted passes), an interception and two forced fumbles.

In last weekend's wild-card round playoff triumph over the Panthers, Jordan not only had a sack, a tackle for loss, a QB hit and two batted passes, but he also forced Cam Newton into a pivotal intentional grounding penalty. That play turned a second-and-10 at the Saints 21-yard line with 41 seconds left into third-and-23 at the New Orleans 34—with just 19 seconds to go after a 10-second runoff for an offensive penalty in the final minute. The Panthers could not recover in a 31-26 loss.

Now Jordan returns to Minnesota, where he spent his early childhood while his father was being named to Pro Bowls—six in all—for the Vikings.

Cam Jordan said he expects his father to be at the game, along with old family friends from the area. Whether he brings along another bottle of his namesake wine is to be determined, he said.

Steve Jordan's career ended in 1994, when Cam was 5. Soon after, they moved to Arizona. The younger Jordan considers the Phoenix area his home, as he says, because that's where he had his first kiss and learned how to drive. He doesn't get all that nostalgic about returning to Minneapolis.

"I'm not going to lie to you. My memories of that young childhood is sort of in and out. I remember jumping in some leaves, getting so cold outside we got locked out of a car," Jordan said with a chuckle. But he also fondly remembers meeting a number of "my dad's co-workers, and they turned out to be legends. You talk about (defensive end) Chris Doleman, you talk about (safety) Joey Browner, (running back) Darrin Nelsons of the game. I won't talk about Herschel Walker, because he ruined (that) franchise.

"You grow up and you get drafted by the Saints," Jordan added. "This is my team. This is my family. This is who I'm playing for."

Saints coach Sean Payton generally urges his players to refrain from providing opponents with bulletin-board material, but didn't sound inclined to rein in Jordan.

"It's just Cam's personality," Payton said. "He's someone that's funny. I don't think outspoken is the word. I think he's humorous and I think he genuinely enjoys what he does and that's just how it's expressed. Outside of that, I'm glad he's on our team."

Likewise, Vikings offensive linemen didn't sound inclined to talk tough about shutting up Jordan. They deferred to a more respectful approach.

"He's had a great career, great year, and it's going to be a tough battle," Vikings offensive tackle Mike Remmers said. "The first thing that we'd like to do is just block him. He's just fast, physical, just a smart player. He's really got a little bit of everything."

Vikings QB Case Keenum called Jordan "a really talented player" who "creates a lot of havoc in the backfield in the run or pass game—a guy that we need to know where he's at at all times."

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