Texas A&M Texarkana holds Constitution Day event

Dr. Daniel Mintun, left, listens as Dr. Gary Bugh speaks about the process of appointing and approving of Supreme Court justices on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022, at Texas A&M University-Texarkana in Texarkana, Texas. (Staff photo by Mallory Wyatt)
Dr. Daniel Mintun, left, listens as Dr. Gary Bugh speaks about the process of appointing and approving of Supreme Court justices on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022, at Texas A&M University-Texarkana in Texarkana, Texas. (Staff photo by Mallory Wyatt)

TEXARKANA, Texas — Texas A&M University-Texarkana students posed questions to political science professors Dr. Gary Bugh and Dr. Daniel Mintun about the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights after a lecture on Thursday at Eagle Hall.

The event was in partnership with the law-oriented greek organization Phi Delta Phi and TAMU-T’s Program for Learning and Community Engagement. Attendees got a free pocket Constitution and pizza.

“We hold this in celebration of Constitution Day, which is a national holiday. It’s officially on Sept. 17, but that’s falling on a weekend so we did it today,” Bugh said.

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Student Justin LeGrand asked questions of the lecturers, mainly pertaining to term limits on senators and other government representatives.

“I came because I wanted to learn more about the constitution. I learned that I like the way it laid out the foundation of our country. I also wanted to get a pocket Constitution,” LeGrand said.

According to TAMU-T, Bugh has written about constitutional law and the Supreme Court in peer-reviewed publications. Mintun specializes in international relations and conflict and recently gave an on-campus talk about the Russo-Ukrainian conflict.

The professors spoke of the three branches of government: legislative, judicial and executive; how the Supreme Court justices are appointed and approved to their positions; term limits for senators; and the approaches that the Constitution took in regard to pirates in the 1700s.

Texarkana transplant James Robinson contributed questions to the lecture and said that he wanted to get a better understanding of the U.S. government.

“I’ve always been infatuated with it. I thought it would be highly informative to listen to a new perspective,” Robinson said.


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