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story.lead_photo.caption House Homeland Security Committee member Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) questions witnesses during a hearing on 'worldwide threats to the homeland' in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill September 17, 2020 in Washington, D.C. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images/TNS)

DALLAS — When Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, invited submissions from whistleblowers in the armed forces last week, he vowed not to let the U.S. military fall prey to "woke ideology."

He probably wasn't expecting quite so many references to classic television shows "M*A*S*H" and "The A-Team" that used politically incorrect dialogue and plots to ridicule the congressman.

The plan by Crenshaw, a former Navy SEAL who lost an eye in Afghanistan, and his partner in the project, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., was to embarrass the brass by publishing "egregious complaints on social media and tell the country what's happening in our military."

"For too long, progressive Pentagon staffers have been calling the shots for our warfighters, and spineless military commanders have let it happen," Crenshaw tweeted. "Now we are going to expose you."

Crenshaw and Cotton haven't revealed the contents of any whistleblower submissions yet. Critics have turned their effort against them, posting screenshots of satirical complaints uploaded to the website.

"I am a surgeon stationed at a mobile hospital unit in Korea. I have several complaints," reads one such "complaint" written in the voice of the priggish Maj. Frank Burns from "M*A*S*H," one of the highest rated TV shows ever during its 11 season run. "Not least of all, the two clowns I am forced to bunk with are running a still in the quarters, to make alcohol."

"My Sgt referred to me as Francis even after I VERY SPECIFICALLY ASKED NOT TO BE ADDRESSED THAT WAY," reads another based on Bill Murray's 1981 Army movie "Stripes."

Another "complaint" evokes the 1992 court martial drama "A Few Good Men," in which lawyer Tom Cruise exposes Guantanamo Bay Naval Base commander Jack Nicholson's role in a murder: "I think my base commander may have ordered a 'code red' to kill a fellow marine who was not fitting in well at the baseWhen I confronted him about it, he told me that I 'could not handle the truth.'"

Crenshaw has so far ignored the mockery. A spokesperson declined to say how many responses have come in and what proportion involve genuine allegations. They are reviewing responses and vetting them for potential publishing.

"There has been a disturbing uptick in cases under President Biden in which military leadership is advancing an overtly political agenda that includes critical race theory, identity politics, and blatant activism when training our war fighters," Crenshaw said in a statement.

Conservatives have been accusing the Biden administration of trying to impose ideological purity tests.

Last month, the head of a Space Force squadron that detects ballistic missile launches was fired after accusing the military of pushing a Marxist agenda. Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier repeated the allegation while promoting his book "Irresistible Revolution: Marxism's Goal of Conquest & the Unmaking of the American Military."

According to Space Operations Command, Lt. Gen. Stephen Whiting relieved Lohmeier of his duties "due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead."

Lohmeier has become the focus of a right-wing uproar since then. Cotton met with him the day before he and Crenshaw launched the whistleblower portal on Crenshaw's congressional website.

Cotton asserted that Lohmeier was fired for "warning about the dangers of Marxism in the military."

"If you're a member of the military and being taught that the military is a systematically racist institution, that America is a fundamentally racist country, or that any race of Americans is inherently an 'oppressor' or 'victim,' I want to hear from you," the senator tweeted.

The whistleblower effort began after GOP lawmakers wrote Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin to complain about "the growing trend of left-wing extremism and politicization" in the U.S. armed forces.

Among the seven co-signers was freshman Rep. Ronny Jackson of Amarillo, and a number of other Texas Republicans joined the fray, echoing the complaints on social media.

Austin Rep. Chip Roy tweeted that he's proud to join the "fight against the radical leftist ideologies infecting and weakening our military."

"Perhaps one day even progressives will judge our military members by their heroism and not by the color of their political party," tweeted Rep. Louie Gohmert of Tyler.

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